When the Missionary Fathers came to Mindanao in 1939, they were confronted with the difficult problem of how to reach out to the people to spread the Word of God. After much consideration, Fr. Gerard Mongeau, OMI and his Oblate brothers thought that the best way to reach as many people as possible was through the establishment of schools. They therefore decided to open the first high school in Midsayap because the system of highways at that time made Midsayap the crossroads of the province. The “experiment” was at the same time intended to test the reaction of the people to the idea of a Catholic school.

Since the Philippines and the Oblate congregation are both dedicated to Our Lady, it was natural that the school should be placed under her protection. It was Fr. Joseph Boyd, OMI, who suggested the name NOTRE DAME. Hence, in July 1941, the NOTRE DAME ACADEMY in Midsayap opened its doors. It was the first link in the long chain of Notre Dame schools which today number 194 and form the Notre Dame Educational Association.

Fr. Edward Gordon, OMI was appointed the first Director and Mother Ma. Isabel Purification, RVM was the first principal. The school opened two first year and two second year sections in a four-room building of wood, sawali and bamboo. Fr. Gil Beaudoin, OMI, Mrs. Rosario Medina and Mrs. Milagros Penson completed the teaching staff. The outbreak of World War II on December 8, 1941 put an end to this project.

The Oblate Fathers, being Americans were placed in internment in various places. Those in Santo Tomas talked about the Oblate commitment to education. The opinion prevailed that the Oblate should not expand into education. It was felt that parochial work was more important and fulfilled the purpose for which the Oblates came to the Philippines . They agreed to re-open only Notre Dame Academy in Midsayap since it was already started and no other. Later, events would show that the people of Cotabato did not agree.

Notre Dame of Midsayap was reopened in 1946 with Father Robert Sullivan, OMI as Director and Mother Belen Tolentino, RVM as the Principal. There were 302 first and second year students. Hence, ND Midsayap College has the distinction of being the Mother of all Notre Dame schools throughout the Philippines. The school continued to grow and many “daughter” Notre Dame Schools were born in the neighboring areas of Pikit, Pigcawayan, Libungan and Edcor.

A big leap forward was taken on June 13, 1960 with the opening of the collegiate department with Father Charles Prass, OMI, as the first Rector. On June 11, 1961, the Elementary Training Department started operation as the laboratory school of the college. Another milestone was the offering of high school classes at night on July 1, 1960 to serve those who work in the day. This was the contribution of OMI Fathers Thomas Lenert and Ernest Sylvestre. In 1966-1967, the Notre Dame High School for Girls was turned over to the RVM Sisters.

The growth of the College Unit could be gleaned from the following statistics: School Year 1960-1961: 397, School Year 2002-2003: 1,788 students. It offers the following courses: Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor in Secondary Education, Bachelor in Elementary Education, Bachelor of Science in Commerce, Bachelor of Science in Accountancy, Bachelor of Science in Computer Science, Bachelor of Science in Information Management, Bachelor of Science in Nursing and Associate in Computer Technology.

The College has given emphasis on Community Extension as another service of the school. The students and personnel are made aware of the social conditions around them and are encouraged to participate actively in the alleviation of the sufferings of the poor, oppressed and marginalized, which is mandated by its Vision to “bring the Good New to the Poor”. Non-formal education for out-of-school youth and unemployed adults are part of Community Extension work. Integrated Extension programs have been started in the depressed upland farming areas of Barangays, Kimagango, Milaya, Bitoka, Anonang and Santa Cruz . It has now also helped the towns of Libungan, Pikit, Carmen and Magpet in doing its Five-Year Development Plan. Aside from these, the academic community also has its school-based extension programs.

One good development, which the College undertook, was the building of Endowment Funds such as the ILAW Fund, Library Endowment fund, Student Assistance Fund, Elementary Fund, and NDMC Development Fund. Except for its interest earning, the principal is not touched. Each fund has a definite purpose and has helped the College achieve some of its dreams and plans.

School-Year 1990-1991 was the Golden Year. The Jubilee Endowment Fund called GIFTS (Golden Investment Fund for Teachers, Staff and Students) came into being. The two-fold purpose was to improve personnel salaries and to minimize tuition fee increases.

During the School Year 1991-1992, the College undertook the Strategic Planning Workshop (SPW). The SPW was a thorough process which surfaced the following targets: Organizational Stability, Quality Education and Financial Viability. In the implementation of SPW recommendations, the College was at the same engaged in more preparations for the next accreditation level.

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The most coveted status for any college worthy of the name is to be accredited and become a member of the Philippines Accrediting Association of Schools, Colleges and Universities (PAASCU). On August 6, 1989, Notre Dame of Midsayap College was granted Level I accreditation for its three programs, namely, Liberal Arts, Teachers College and Commerce. This was the result of the long preparation which started in School-Year 1983-1984 with the Preliminary Visit of a team of PAASCU accreditors headed by Fr. Bellarmine Baltazar, OSB. This was followed by the First Formal Visit of February, 1989 with Ms. Concepcion Rosales as the team leader. This was timely because Notre Dame of Midsayap College was about to celebrate its Golden Jubilee as an educational institution. The PAASCU second visit was on February 10-11, 1994 and the Level Accreditation was granted on March 25, 1996.
School Year 1996-1997 found Notre Dame of Midsayap College launching into computerization. Modular Training Programs were offered to personnel and external clientele. Computer units were also acquired for the computer laboratory of the Elementary and High School Units.

With the goal to ensure future financial sustainability and to provide affordable quality education, the College ventured into income generating projects like the two- storey Plaza Madonna Building . It has become one of the landmarks of Midsayap. This had been converted into a foundation named Notre Dame of Midsayap Educational Foundation, Inc. (NDMEFI).

The College has put emphasis on activities that seek to enhance the appreciation, preservation and enrichment of the students’ Filipino heritage and to encourage the development of other potentials to enable them to do their part in the task of nation-building.

When the Missionary Fathers came to Mindanao in 1939, they were confronted with the difficult problem of how to reach out to the people to spread the Word of God. After much consideration, Fr. Gerard Mongeau, OMI and his Oblate brothers thought that the best way to reach as many people as possible was through the establishment of schools. They therefore decided to open the first high school in Midsayap because the system of highways at that time made Midsayap the crossroads of the province. The “experiment” was at the same time intended to test the reaction of the people to the idea of a Catholic school.

Since the Philippines and the Oblate congregation are both dedicated to Our Lady, it was natural that the school should be placed under her protection. It was Fr. Joseph Boyd, OMI, who suggested the name NOTRE DAME. Hence, in July 1941, the NOTRE DAME ACADEMY in Midsayap opened its doors. It was the first link in the long chain of Notre Dame schools which today number 194 and form the Notre Dame Educational Association.

Fr. Edward Gordon, OMI was appointed the first Director and Mother Ma. Isabel Purification, RVM was the first principal. The school opened two first year and two second year sections in a four-room building of wood, sawali and bamboo. Fr. Gil Beaudoin, OMI, Mrs. Rosario Medina and Mrs. Milagros Penson completed the teaching staff. The outbreak of World War II on December 8, 1941 put an end to this project.

The Oblate Fathers, being Americans were placed in internment in various places. Those in Santo Tomas talked about the Oblate commitment to education. The opinion prevailed that the Oblate should not expand into education. It was felt that parochial work was more important and fulfilled the purpose for which the Oblates came to the Philippines . They agreed to re-open only Notre Dame Academy in Midsayap since it was already started and no other. Later, events would show that the people of Cotabato did not agree.

Notre Dame of Midsayap was reopened in 1946 with Father Robert Sullivan, OMI as Director and Mother Belen Tolentino, RVM as the Principal. There were 302 first and second year students. Hence, ND Midsayap College has the distinction of being the Mother of all Notre Dame schools throughout the Philippines. The school continued to grow and many “daughter” Notre Dame Schools were born in the neighboring areas of Pikit, Pigcawayan, Libungan and Edcor.

A big leap forward was taken on June 13, 1960 with the opening of the collegiate department with Father Charles Prass, OMI, as the first Rector. On June 11, 1961, the Elementary Training Department started operation as the laboratory school of the college. Another milestone was the offering of high school classes at night on July 1, 1960 to serve those who work in the day. This was the contribution of OMI Fathers Thomas Lenert and Ernest Sylvestre. In 1966-1967, the Notre Dame High School for Girls was turned over to the RVM Sisters.

The growth of the College Unit could be gleaned from the following statistics: School Year 1960-1961: 397, School Year 2002-2003: 1,788 students. It offers the following courses: Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor in Secondary Education, Bachelor in Elementary Education, Bachelor of Science in Commerce, Bachelor of Science in Accountancy, Bachelor of Science in Computer Science, Bachelor of Science in Information Management, Bachelor of Science in Nursing and Associate in Computer Technology.

The College has given emphasis on Community Extension as another service of the school. The students and personnel are made aware of the social conditions around them and are encouraged to participate actively in the alleviation of the sufferings of the poor, oppressed and marginalized, which is mandated by its Vision to “bring the Good New to the Poor”. Non-formal education for out-of-school youth and unemployed adults are part of Community Extension work. Integrated Extension programs have been started in the depressed upland farming areas of Barangays, Kimagango, Milaya, Bitoka, Anonang and Santa Cruz . It has now also helped the towns of Libungan, Pikit, Carmen and Magpet in doing its Five-Year Development Plan. Aside from these, the academic community also has its school-based extension programs.

One good development, which the College undertook, was the building of Endowment Funds such as the ILAW Fund, Library Endowment fund, Student Assistance Fund, Elementary Fund, and NDMC Development Fund. Except for its interest earning, the principal is not touched. Each fund has a definite purpose and has helped the College achieve some of its dreams and plans.

School-Year 1990-1991 was the Golden Year. The Jubilee Endowment Fund called GIFTS (Golden Investment Fund for Teachers, Staff and Students) came into being. The two-fold purpose was to improve personnel salaries and to minimize tuition fee increases.

During the School Year 1991-1992, the College undertook the Strategic Planning Workshop (SPW). The SPW was a thorough process which surfaced the following targets: Organizational Stability, Quality Education and Financial Viability. In the implementation of SPW recommendations, the College was at the same engaged in more preparations for the next accreditation level.

.

The most coveted status for any college worthy of the name is to be accredited and become a member of the Philippines Accrediting Association of Schools, Colleges and Universities (PAASCU). On August 6, 1989, Notre Dame of Midsayap College was granted Level I accreditation for its three programs, namely, Liberal Arts, Teachers College and Commerce. This was the result of the long preparation which started in School-Year 1983-1984 with the Preliminary Visit of a team of PAASCU accreditors headed by Fr. Bellarmine Baltazar, OSB. This was followed by the First Formal Visit of February, 1989 with Ms. Concepcion Rosales as the team leader. This was timely because Notre Dame of Midsayap College was about to celebrate its Golden Jubilee as an educational institution. The PAASCU second visit was on February 10-11, 1994 and the Level Accreditation was granted on March 25, 1996.
.

School Year 1996-1997 found Notre Dame of Midsayap College launching into computerization. Modular Training Programs were offered to personnel and external clientele. Computer units were also acquired for the computer laboratory of the Elementary and High School Units.

With the goal to ensure future financial sustainability and to provide affordable quality education, the College ventured into income generating projects like the two- storey Plaza Madonna Building . It has become one of the landmarks of Midsayap. This had been converted into a foundation named Notre Dame of Midsayap Educational Foundation, Inc. (NDMEFI).

The College has put emphasis on activities that seek to enhance the appreciation, preservation and enrichment of the students’ Filipino heritage and to encourage the development of other potentials to enable them to do their part in the task of nation-building.

.from Notre Dame of Midsayap College Website